Read Best Silver's City By Maurice Leitch – Mariahilff.de

The Devil hath established His cities in the North Maurice Leitch quotes St Augustine, and the city in question is the Belfast of the late 70 s early 80 s that Leitch knows and recreates so convincingly.Silver is a Loyalist prisoner, his heroic status proclaimed on the gable walls of the working class Protestant areas of Belfast He is sprung from his hospital sick bed by his erstwhile comrades but their intentions, he quickly realises, aren t benign Silver has, despite his legendary statu The Devil hath established His cities in the North Maurice Leitch quotes St Augustine, and the city in question is the Belfast of the late 70 s early 80 s that Leitch knows and recreates so convincingly.Silver is a Loyalist prisoner, his heroic status proclaimed on the gable walls of the working class Protestant areas of Belfast He is sprung from his hospital sick bed by his erstwhile comrades but their intentions, he quickly realises, aren t benign Silver has, despite his legendary status, become a source of concern for the hierarchy on the outside Silver has recorded his evolving inner thoughts on old cassette tapes and his orthodoxy, and loyalty, is in doubt He escapes from his old comrades but, in the crucible of Belfast, Silver s city, where can he be free In the rigid demarcation of the time, in all the middle class areas he would be an alien curiosity and soon recaptured, in the working class Catholic areas he would immediately be held as a trophy prisoner until his inevitable execution.Silver s City, in the end, is limited to the working class Protestant streets where he might see Silver Rules OK scrawled on a wall but those familiar streets are now as dangerous as the others.Silver escapes to the countryside with a woman who, at least initially, is intoxicated by his singular celebrity Silver, with no other option, goes along for the ride but anticipates that he will betray her sooner rather than later.He is hunted now by the Loyalist hit man, Ned Galloway,Hyde than Jekyll, who himself becomes estranged from the paramilitary leadership and who now seeks redemption by inflicting slow pain and death on Silver.The Belfast described by Leitch is claustrophobic and cruel Silver is treated to a night out in the local social club, the sort of place where all patrons are sound , where a stranger won t be admitted or, if they are admitted, will immediately be assessed for the required loyalty quotient and, where they don t meet the benchmark, may very well be found dead in a dark alleyway The stark interior serves as a stomping ground for the enforcers in a not so secret army everybody acknowledging the divine right of armed authority Silver s dilemna is that it was in such places his reputation, his power, was nurtured and burnished now somebody else holds the power and he is a threat.The basic plot of the story could easily be transplanted to any place where the powerful abuse their power In Leitch s hands, though, Belfast, Silver s City, is an intractable character in its own right Written over 35 years ago, much of the physical character of the city has changed but the ingrained sense of place, and the prerequisite loyalty to your own, and the attendant suspicion, or hostility, to the other may seem dormant but the levers to spark to animated fury can still be manipulated.To Leitch s great credit, he allows his characters the respect to be as they are without much in the way of overwrought moralising many Troubles writers can t resist the temptation to thread their own take on the conflict into the fabric of the story often it is the this would be a great wee country if the terrorists would leave it alone or vulnerable and or misguided idealistic youth duped by cunning criminal armchair godfathers on the make , and sometimes with a couple of star crossed lovers reaching across the barricades Instead, we find Leitch s characters doing what they do and being who they are the pompous local commander Bonner, the sociopathic killer Galloway, exorcising his pent up frustrations by cold blooded executions of family men in front of young daughters, the disillusioned Nan taking Silver as her opportunity to escape her disappointment in her miserable Belfast life And Silver, his destiny determined at birth, capitulating to the fate the city demands The light was beginning to fail outside, he could tell, despite his eyes He thought of the city and the street lamps lighting one by one, the city that had made him what he was Old and cynical begetter, it watched its sons come, it watched them go Despite dreams, he had been brought back down to the level of its streets, as it always knew he would Perhaps they would lock him away from the others this time He would have plenty of time to go over the things that crammed his head That would be his sentence, for the city always made you pay for your dreams Against the background of war torn Belfast, two men engage in a bitter private duel Ned Galloway, a street wise gunman profiting from the people s anxiety, is hired to spring Silver Steele, a jailed folk hero, from a guarded hospital room This book won the Guardian Fiction Prize Thirty six years after its original publication, the Whitbread Prize winning Silver s City has been republished, introducing a whole new generation of readers to the literary voice of Maurice Leitch Set in the dark days of the Troubles, the tale is dark, gritty and loaded with the tension of the times Loyalist gunman and hero Silver Steele has been sprung from his 10 year detention in the cages of Her Majesty s Prison and is now under the protection of a hit man named Galloway The streets o Thirty six years after its original publication, the Whitbread Prize winning Silver s City has been republished, introducing a whole new generation of readers to the literary voice of Maurice Leitch Set in the dark days of the Troubles, the tale is dark, gritty and loaded with the tension of the times Loyalist gunman and hero Silver Steele has been sprung from his 10 year detention in the cages of Her Majesty s Prison and is now under the protection of a hit man named Galloway The streets of Belfast have changed during Silver s incarceration and the men seem to be fighting for a different cause Roads blocks, checkpoints and helicopter presence are omnipresent but the atmosphere has changed It was rare to hear any mention of religion, no matter how oblique, these days People were wary, had learned the lesson well The talk is now of prisoner protests and privileges Galloway is hardcore, yet Silver is spent Two strangers, thrown together in a world of bigotry and hatred, with a tenuous link A timely reminder of hard borders and religious intolerance Silver s City is a grim thriller set in the early days of the Troubles Silver Steele is a high profile prisoner who fired the first shot in the Troubles and his name is spelt out across the walls of Loyalist Belfast Ten years of prison have changed Silver Military discipline, reading and solitary thinking mean that the man who is busted out is far different form the young man who went in Evenstriking is the difference between what the city was and what it has become It began to see Silver s City is a grim thriller set in the early days of the Troubles Silver Steele is a high profile prisoner who fired the first shot in the Troubles and his name is spelt out across the walls of Loyalist Belfast Ten years of prison have changed Silver Military discipline, reading and solitary thinking mean that the man who is busted out is far different form the young man who went in Evenstriking is the difference between what the city was and what it has become It began to seem like a crazy planet out there, beyond the chicken wire, with politicians roaring on, off, hot and cold, ordinary people in the grip of violent and unreasonable action for its own sake This would be a good primer for anyone trying to get a handle on the forces that tore, and still tear, at the fabric of society in Northern Ireland A superior slice of highbrow pulp