[[ Audible ]] Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone BeforeAuthor Tony Horwitz – Mariahilff.de

Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone BeforeTwo centuries after James Cook s epic voyages of discovery, Tony Horwitz takes readers on a wild ride across hemispheres and centuries to recapture the Captain s adventures and explore his embattled legacy in today s Pacific Horwitz, a Pulitzer Prize winner and author of Confederates in the Attic, works as a sailor aboard a replica of Cook s ship, meets island kings and beauty queens, and carouses the South Seas with a hilarious and disgraceful travel companion, an Aussie named Roger He also creates a brilliant portrait of Cook an impoverished farmboy who became the greatest navigator in British history and forever changed the lands he touched Poignant, probing, antic, and exhilarating, Blue Latitudes brings to life a man who helped create the global village we inhabit today


10 thoughts on “Blue Latitudes: Boldly Going Where Captain Cook Has Gone Before

  1. Bob Bob says:

    I can t get enough of Tony Horwitz He s like a smarter, less cheezy Bill Bryson whom I also like, dont get me wrong How Horwitz packs new historical perspective into a book this enjoyable is amazing Every book is the same I feel wiser and happier when I m finished.This journey with Captain Cook was no different An entire part of fairly recent human history I knew nothing about turned into a fun romp through renaissance exploration It added a brilliant understanding of early Pacific peo I can t get enough of Tony Horwitz He s like a smarter, less cheezy Bill Bryson whom I also like, dont get me wrong How Horwitz packs new historical perspective into a book this enjoyable is amazing Every book is the same I feel wiser and happier when I m finished.This journey with Captain Cook was no different An entire part of fairly recent human history I knew nothing about turned into a fun romp through renaissance exploration It added a brilliant understanding of early Pacific people, gave a balanced perspective on Englands colonial spread, and helped you admire the person of Cook himself.Fun Super Interesting Makes you want to be pals with Tony Horwitz all over again


  2. Lauren Lauren says:

    I knew next to nothing about Captain James Cook when i picked up this book history books generally gloss over his voyages, even though he explored an area that encompasses nearly 1 3 of the globe Horwitz s urge to learn all he could about the man and his work is infectious you can see this in the text rubbing off on those around him, as seen in Roger, his companion on many of his Cook travels.Retracing Captain Cook s three voyages, relying heavily on the diaires of Cook himself, Horwitz I knew next to nothing about Captain James Cook when i picked up this book history books generally gloss over his voyages, even though he explored an area that encompasses nearly 1 3 of the globe Horwitz s urge to learn all he could about the man and his work is infectious you can see this in the text rubbing off on those around him, as seen in Roger, his companion on many of his Cook travels.Retracing Captain Cook s three voyages, relying heavily on the diaires of Cook himself, Horwitz decides to take a short trip to the Pacific Northwest to sail for 10 days in a replica of Cook s ship He wanted a feel for the life or a seaman, and he sure gets it Next he sets off to Australia and New Zealand His journalistic style brings in great aspects of history, anthropology, and language He interviews Maori people in New Zealand and Aborigines in Australia, asking them what memories their people have of Cook and his men Both groups remember Captain Cook, oftentimes in a negative light It does not appear that they despise Cook as a man, butof what he stood for, and what his exploration meant for the native culture.Horwitz and Roger then begin to island hop around the Pacific I particularly liked the time they spent on the island of Niue like Horwitz, I had never heard of this island Describing the scene, Horwitz claims it may be the last part of Polynesia that is not spoiled by commercialism and tourists He and Roger stay for a week on this small island only 11 miles long and try to unravel the mystery of the hula hula Cook s men were scared away from these islands by men with red teeth, and they named the island Savage Island because they thought the people were cannibals.Roger and Horwitz go to Yorkshire, England, Cook s birthplace and Roger s too , and take part in a few days of the Cook festival They meet Cliff, the young president of the Captain Cook society, and try to find out as much as they can about the enigmatic Cook Going to Cook s own home gives Horwitz a different take on the man, and he learnsabout Cook s beliefs and his philosophies.Their travels end in Hawaii, like Cook s did in 1778 They commemorate Cook on the beach where he was killed.The other aspect of this book that fascinated me was how Horwitz tried to get into Cook s head Cook was a son of the Enlightenment, and did not come to Polynesia with preconceived notions of God, Gold, and Glory like earlier explorers He wanted to discover and learn about others, and was very scientifically conscious for a man of his time


  3. Linda Linda says:

    In my research for Wai nani, A Voice from Old Hawaii, I read a dozen accounts of Captain James Cook s deadly encounter with the natives of Hawaii in 1779 This included not only the Captains journal, but that of seaman, John Ledyard, and that of first mate, Lt King When Tony Horwitz declared that in Blue Latitudes he would take us boldly where Captain Cook had gone before, I didn t expect to learn anything new What I found was the most informative, well researched, fun account of the famous In my research for Wai nani, A Voice from Old Hawaii, I read a dozen accounts of Captain James Cook s deadly encounter with the natives of Hawaii in 1779 This included not only the Captains journal, but that of seaman, John Ledyard, and that of first mate, Lt King When Tony Horwitz declared that in Blue Latitudes he would take us boldly where Captain Cook had gone before, I didn t expect to learn anything new What I found was the most informative, well researched, fun account of the famous explorer to date Horwitz likens Cook s three voyages of discovery throughout Polynesia and the Northwest to that of the Startrek s explorations into deep space His journalistic style and breezy sense of humor keep historical events fresh I stuck closely to Horwitz account of the events in Kealakekua Bay in the telling of Wai nani s story Her first person narrative allows the reader to know what was happening in the Hawaiian culture on the fateful day the navigator lost his life Controversy over the actual events that took place that week and why rages on, but Horwitz provides an even handed, thoughtful point of view.LindaBallouAuthor.comWai nani, A Voice from Old Hawai i Her Epic Journey


  4. Deborah Edwards Deborah Edwards says:

    Those who would go to sea for pleasure would go to hell for pastime 18th century aphorismIf I were someone who believed in reincarnation, I would have to entertain the notion that I must have been a sea captain in a previous life Why else would I be so fascinated by the lives of the men who set sail on voyages of discovery, risking all to find lost continents, the fabled Northwest passage, or the elusive terra australis And why else would I be so enad of the sea and so terrified by i Those who would go to sea for pleasure would go to hell for pastime 18th century aphorismIf I were someone who believed in reincarnation, I would have to entertain the notion that I must have been a sea captain in a previous life Why else would I be so fascinated by the lives of the men who set sail on voyages of discovery, risking all to find lost continents, the fabled Northwest passage, or the elusive terra australis And why else would I be so enad of the sea and so terrified by it, in equal parts Reading accounts of early voyages, one truly understands the 18th century aphorism quoted above Wooden ships of the day were often nothingthan floating deathtraps with rudimentary equipment, inadequate nutritional reserves, mutinous sailors, rats, filth, and untreatable diseases that could sweep through a ship and ravage its crew at any moment Barring those perils, if injury or drowning could be avoided, generally scurvy would get you regardless Those who survived at all rarely thrived under such conditions, particularly since these ships of discovery were often on voyages lasting several years at a time What kind of man would have the wherewithal, the constitution, the intellect, the bearing, the wanderlust, the stoicism, the curiosity, the luck, and the basic common sense to not only thrive at sea, but set off on three separate voyages of discovery in his forties, no less that changed the face of every map that existed during his lifetime Captain Cook, of course, would be that man His story is remarkable in every possible way He came from absolutely nothing He was a poor Yorkshire farm boy, who like most of the poor Yorkshire farm boys of his time, could probably have hoped for littlethan a hard, bucolic life with few conveniences and little opportunity of ever travelingthan a few miles beyond his home Most people of his time lived and died in the shadow of the same small churchyard Yet Cook ended up traveling hundreds of thousands of miles in his lifetime, reaching parts of the globe no one had ever reached before him and circumnavigating the globe several times over How did this modest man with little schooling, no means, and no lofty connections raise himself up to become a captain in the Royal Navy and possibly the greatest explorer of all time Tony Horwitz became obsessed with this very same question and set off on his own journey of discovery to not only chart the progress of Cook s three very famous voyages, but also to try to uncover the character of the real Captain Cook, a man who has been both honored and vilified by cultures across the globe for over two centuries, cultures for whom Cook seems to signify many things to many people Horwitz is a fantastically engaging writer His casual humor and wry observations put one in mind of Bill Bryson, a comparison which I consider a huge compliment Horwitz knew he wanted to tell Cook s story in a way that would be historically accurate but also would be appealing and readable So, he decided to intersperse the details of Cook s voyages all of which are fascinating in every detail in and of themselves with the story of his own voyage to boldly go where Captain Cook has gone before This was a brilliant tack, and I ll tell you why From reading the journals of Cook and his men, it is obvious that Cook was in many ways the first true anthropologist Yes, others made contact with native peoples before him, but Cook seemed to be the first real practitioner of what modern anthropologists call cultural relativity, the notion of accepting the practices, beliefs and traditions of other cultures, learning and observing without judgment, and attempting to make a positive impact without too greatly affecting the culture as a whole Now, granted, this was the 1700s and not everything went off quite the way Cook would have liked, but that s all detailed in the book Suffice to say, Cook was sort of the Jean Luc Picard of sea exploration if you understand that reference you re as big a dork as I am He wanted to find new frontiers, chart new territory, experience rare flora and fauna, try new cuisine he was a VERY adventurous eater and truly make connections with native peoples not to exploit them, as colonists would, not to strip their resources, as so many others would in his wake, but to see the world and discover all there was to discover just for the sake of doing it and being the first to do so If he were alive today, he d be volunteering for missions to Mars Horwitz, on the other hand, is a journalist who knows the world has been discovered several hundred times over and wants really just to discover Cook The real Cook Not the symbol, not the hero or anti hero His mission is to uncover the truth under mountains of supposition In doing so, he visits many of the same places that Cook visited and details the modern conditions of those peoples in ways that were all largely affected by Cook s discovery of them Sure, if not Cook, someone else would have done so maybe fifty years later, maybe a hundred But Cook was first, and because of that, many cultures see him and maybe rightly so as the villain who opened them up to the hordes of Europeans who later came and decimated them Symbols are powerful things, and Cook became a symbol for his nation and all Western nations who raped the land and its people It s anthropology in action Cook s journals detailing the pristine cultures on first contact Horwitz writing about the long term effects of colonial influence on modern peoples It s all as sobering as it is fascinating, and the modern story has as many discoveries as Cook s did Horwitz keeps it moving along, at just the right pace, and he adds color and comic relief by embarking on many of his journeys with his hard partying friend Roger, another Yorkshire man who hightailed it to Australia, though that s where the Cook analogy ends Roger s jaded demeanor and pithy observations often put things back in perspective when Horwitz s quest for the truth and Cook s idealistic legacy meet incongruous modern roadblocks It took me awhile to get used to Roger, but once I did, I was glad to have him along for the ride There are so many facets to this book, so much history and lore it is difficult to even write a synopsis Patrick O Brian fans will note the similarity between the relationship of Cook and Joseph Banks the young botanist and upper crust adventurer who accompanied Cook on his storied first voyage to that of Aubrey and Maturin Others will note the appearance of William Bligh in the crew of Cook s third voyage, a man who would make history on The Bounty soon afterwards Cook went everywhere Literally everywhere From Polynesia to Antarctica He looked for the Northwest Passage, and befriended Maori cannibals Through it all he seems to have been largely a man of principle, fidelity and acceptance in a world so often unlike him, someone who managed to meet the world on his terms and not necessarily those of his Eurocentric brethren Hopefully, through Tony Horwitz, people will come away with a clearer picture of this captain, mathematician, adventurer, astronomer, and yes, anthropologist, who truly went where no white man had gone before and sometimes beyond that to where no one in the human race had ever gone before And when he was done, he packed up and did it all over again


  5. Mary Mary says:

    Despite an interesting topic Captain Cook and a fascinating setting the Pacific , I found this book ponderous and lacking momentum Perhaps it was the organization but once I d read about Cook s first journey to the South Pacific, I was done with this book I did finish you know by now that if I d quit the rating would be 1 star it s a book It picked up again when the author visited Yorkshire, Cook s childhood home, but then bogged down The end was awkward, bringing in the author s chi Despite an interesting topic Captain Cook and a fascinating setting the Pacific , I found this book ponderous and lacking momentum Perhaps it was the organization but once I d read about Cook s first journey to the South Pacific, I was done with this book I did finish you know by now that if I d quit the rating would be 1 star it s a book It picked up again when the author visited Yorkshire, Cook s childhood home, but then bogged down The end was awkward, bringing in the author s child who we had not heard about at all previously Highlights were the call on the King of Tonga, the visit to Niue and the search for the red banana, and the harrowing description of Cook s navigation of the Great Barrier Reef Even for Todd, a Patrick O Brian and sailing nut, finishing this book felt like penance rather than reward And for me, I felt like I was sitting through a neighbor s slides of his last vacation To be fair, I think this genre of modern travel writing leaves me cold anyway The places intrigue but the writing does not


  6. Mike Mike says:

    This is a 4 Star read had to take one star away But such a good book about a man I knew little about I always wondered where the Sandwich Islands came from, learned about it here Lots of laughs and lots of thoughtful commentary interspersed with the history of Cook s three voyages to the Pacific Horwitz gives you the enjoyable travelogue of a Bill Bryson with almost none of the left wing snark Horwitz and his buddy Roger follow, as best they can, Cook s journeys and visit many of the isl This is a 4 Star read had to take one star away But such a good book about a man I knew little about I always wondered where the Sandwich Islands came from, learned about it here Lots of laughs and lots of thoughtful commentary interspersed with the history of Cook s three voyages to the Pacific Horwitz gives you the enjoyable travelogue of a Bill Bryson with almost none of the left wing snark Horwitz and his buddy Roger follow, as best they can, Cook s journeys and visit many of the islands The visits are both interesting and sad Horwitz recounts the island cultures of the day and compares it to what it is now The book begins with Horwitz taking a short working cruise on the replica of Cook s first Pacific ship, the Endeavour, in order to understand just what the men faced as they sailed into the unknown If I d been aboard the original Endeavour, the journey ahead would have loomed rather larger 1,052 days, to be exact, assuming I was among the 60 percent who survived This was a notion I struggled to wrap my mind around I d often felt sorry for myself when flying to and from Australia Twenty hours in the air A forced march through movies, meals, and mystery novels Almost the limit of the modern traveler s endurance Yet it had taken Cook and his men a year and a half to reach Australia, and almost as long to get home again.The accounts of Cook s travels and his exploits are amazing Ben Franklin ordered the US Navy to treat Cook and his men as friends in the middle of the Revolutionary War Catherine the Great followed his explorations I gained a great deal of admiration for these explorers Reading Cook s journals is a constant reminder of how specialized our skills have become in the modern era On one page, Cook discusses astronomy, geology, meteorology, and animal husbandry On the next, he offers insight into management, commerce, and diplomacy Then he veers into lengthy speculation about ocean currents, the formation of islands Few people today would even dream of dabbling in so many disciplines, much less mastering them Cook didn t excel at everything He was a merely competent linguist who leaned heavily on other crewmen when assembling native vocabularies Cook also freely acknowledged that religion remained a mystery to him Nonetheless, he seems such a polymath that his occasional blind spots come as a shock One such limitation was his shaky grasp of Polynesian politics In his approach to almost every other realm of Pacific life including sexual s and cannibalism Cook displayed a steady shrewdness and lack of bias But when it came to navigating island governance, Cook often tried to squeeze very foreign customs into an inelastic British box.I have a forest of little markers sticking out of my copy noting key events I should come back later and do a better review Fantastic book, lots of fun mixed in with serious scholarship


  7. Ensiform Ensiform says:

    Over 440 pages, the American author follows in Cook s footsteps, recounting the captain s exploits every step of the way He meets British admirers of Cook, Maoris who excoriate the man as a murderous syphilitic invader, Australians who are ignorant of his exploits, and Pacific Islanders who accept him as part of their history He interviews the king of Tongo, sails on a replica of Cook s ship The Endeavor, and drops in on remote Inuit fishing villages Trying to get at the heart of Cook, Horwit Over 440 pages, the American author follows in Cook s footsteps, recounting the captain s exploits every step of the way He meets British admirers of Cook, Maoris who excoriate the man as a murderous syphilitic invader, Australians who are ignorant of his exploits, and Pacific Islanders who accept him as part of their history He interviews the king of Tongo, sails on a replica of Cook s ship The Endeavor, and drops in on remote Inuit fishing villages Trying to get at the heart of Cook, Horwitz quotes from his journals, and those of his crew, and ponders the puzzle of Cook s last days.This is one of the best travel books though it s easily just as much history as travel that I have ever read Horwitz does his research, puts in the miles, and digs around to find anything and everything apposite to Cook including trying to track down a reputed arrow made from his leg bone in Hawaii I never thought much about Cook before, but judging from this book, he s easily one of the tremendous giants of his era, an fearless and Enlightened adventurer Asthan one modern day ship s pilot says of Cook, the things he did with what he did when he did are simply unfathomable


  8. Dana Stabenow Dana Stabenow says:

    In Blue Latitudes journalist Tony Horwitz follows in the footsteps of Captain Cook, beginning with a week working as a member of the crew on board a replica of Cook s ship Endeavor I d always thought of Cook as this stereotypical British officer, all his buttons properly polished and looking down a very long nose at all these dreadful loincloth clad natives In fact, Cook was born in a pigsty, was subject in his youth to a strong Quaker influence, and worked his way up from shoveling coal to ca In Blue Latitudes journalist Tony Horwitz follows in the footsteps of Captain Cook, beginning with a week working as a member of the crew on board a replica of Cook s ship Endeavor I d always thought of Cook as this stereotypical British officer, all his buttons properly polished and looking down a very long nose at all these dreadful loincloth clad natives In fact, Cook was born in a pigsty, was subject in his youth to a strong Quaker influence, and worked his way up from shoveling coal to captain in the British Navy He wrote about the aboriginal people he met with respect and admiration His name is now a bad word all over the Pacific, but in truth Cook was the best white man they d ever meet This already lively narrative is madeso by Horwitz travelling buddy Roger, one of the funniest, most cynical guys ever to walk through the pages of a book


  9. Jolanta (knygupe) Jolanta (knygupe) says:

    3.9 Visai smagiai pakeliauta keliautojo, kartografo, atradejo kapitono James Cook pedomis Ambition leads me not only farther any other man has been before me, but as far as I think it possible for man to go The Journal of Captain James Cook 3.9 Visai smagiai pakeliauta keliautojo, kartografo, atradejo kapitono James Cook pedomis Ambition leads me not only farther any other man has been before me, but as far as I think it possible for man to go The Journal of Captain James Cook


  10. Linda Linda says:

    This book was laugh out loud funny The author, along with his buddy, retrace the travels of Captain Cook The book goes back and forth between the history of Captain Cook, and what the places that he visited are like today as the author visits them Highly recommended.